How to Give Notice

Whether you are working in a permanent or temporary position, quitting your job is a complicated procedure. The key to a successful career is networking with peers and coworkers, so you don’t want to burn bridges when leaving a position.

Guidelines to follow:

  • Give Proper Notice
    • When telling your supervisor that you are quitting, you want to give them as much notice as possible in order to give them time to fill your position.
    • Announcing to your boss that you are quitting and today is going to be your last day leaves them with the same amount of work, but less people around to help.
    • Your employer was kind enough to give you a chance and a job in the first place, so the least you can do is give them a couple weeks to find your replacement.
    • Two weeks notice is the acceptable amount of time recommended to most professionals. If you are in a temporary position however, one week should be fine.
  • Quit in Person
    • You wouldn’t break up with a person through an email, and it is just as rude to quit your job through one.
    • Arrange a time to sit face-to-face with your boss to tell them you will be ending your position.
    • Your boss will be much more appreciative if you give them the respect of quitting in person, where you can look them in the eye and explain your situation thoroughly.
  • Don’t Burn Bridges
    • As we mentioned previously, you do not want to lose the connections you made at your position when you quit.
    • Be as respectful and appreciative as possible when quitting, because without your current employer and the experience you gained from them, you might not have been qualified for a new job in the first place.
    • Even if you didn’t use your current employer as a reference for your new position, you might need to use them in the future.
    • Make sure you leave your job on good terms, so you can use them as a reference if you ever need to. Also, you want to make sure that the reference they provide will be a good one!

 

 

Why Your First Post-Graduate Job is Important

When college graduates receive their diploma and start their job hunt, they typically assume that the “education” phase of their life is over, but they couldn’t be more wrong. Your first job out of college will teach you innumerable, valuable lessons that you will carry with you through the rest of your career. Find out exactly how important your first “real” job is by reading on below:

  1. You will get a reality check: Starting a full-time position will require you to be somewhere every day at the same time for most likely eight or nine hours a day. Recent college graduates used to waking up at ten, going to classes for a few hours and then returning home will surely have to make a big adjustment for full-time work. In the real world there is no such thing as “skipping class” or “playing hooky.” You will be accountable for your time and a low attendance record will result in more than just a bad grade.
  2. You will learn to be professional: Immersing yourself into company culture will require you to adhere to a dress code, and it will teach you how to speak and interact with others in a professional manner.
  3. You will learn how to prioritize: In college, you were given an assignment, specific instructions, and a due date. In the real world, work is not always so black and white. You may be given several assignments with conflicting deadlines and importance, and you will have to learn how to prioritize your workload.
  4. You will make important networking connections: If you are lucky, your first job can be a great starting point for your career. You can make valuable connections with people who can help you progress within your desired industry or career. In college, most of the networking you did was probably through your professors or parents, but in the real world you can make connections of your own.
  5. You will learn and gain experience: The most important thing you will gain from your first job will be valuable knowledge and experience. The hands-on experience gained in a full-time job will teach you lessons you could have never fully grasped in a college classroom. You will make mistakes and have successes that will teach you life lessons you can take with you throughout your career.

 

 

How to Improve Your Career in 2017

A new year brings new opportunities and the chance to set some new goals for yourself and your career. Here are some ideas for how you can improve your career this year:

  1. Learn a new language: diverse communication skills are highly desirable in the workplace.
  2. Pursue a new degree or certificate: a higher degree or certificate could be your ticket to a promotion.
  3. Build your professional network: attend local networking events to meet professionals who could help you in your career.
  4. Take a trip: international experience is another highly desirable skill.
  5. Use your vacation days: many professionals argue that taking time off from work can result in higher productivity levels upon your return.
  6. Take on new responsibilities: build your experience by volunteering for new tasks.
  7. Exercise more: exercise can help decrease your stress levels, which will make you more productive at work.
  8. Wake up 10 minutes earlier: allow yourself more time to get ready in the morning to ensure you are always punctual for work.
  9. Talk to your boss: ensure you are on-track and meeting expectations by keeping an open line of communication with your supervisor.
  10. Organize your time: always keep your calendar handy to ensure you never miss a meeting, deadline, or call.

 

Keep a Positive Attitude

It’s easy to get down on yourself or feel defeated after a long job search with little progress, but don’t let your lack of success affect your motivation! Confidence is key for a successful job search, so make sure you keep a positive attitude.

  1. Be grateful: One way to stay positive is to be appreciative of any opportunities you do find. Send a follow-up thank you email to potential employers after every interview. Make sure you let them know how grateful you are for their time and consideration.
  2. Don’t assume: Don’t assume that you are the perfect fit for every position you apply for. Make sure you do your homework and research each position/company before sending your resume. Many applicants are offended or surprised when they don’t receive an interview request for a position they think they’re perfect for. Avoid this stress by only applying for positions you know (not think) you are a fit for!

Stay confident: Job seekers who have been in the market for a long time can begin to feel defeated. Don’t bring this negative attitude with you to job interviews! Potential employers want to hire positive, confident professionals, so be sure to present yourself that way!

Top Ten Rules for Job Seekers

Every job is different, and so is the application/interview process for each job. While it’s difficult to create rules that will apply for job seekers everywhere, we have done our best below. Check out the rules we believe are applicable for any professional looking for work:

  1. Always bring a few copies of your resume to an interview, whether or not you were asked to.
  2. Always read job descriptions thoroughly and research companies before submitting an application.
  3. Always err on the side of overdressed rather than underdressed when choosing your interview outfit.
  4. Never show up more than fifteen minutes early for an interview. (Unless otherwise instructed by your interviewer)
  5. Always include your address and contact information on your resume.
  6. Review your resume frequently and revise it as necessary.
  7. Always specifically follow a hiring manager’s instructions regarding applying, following-up, interviewing and/or testing.
  8. Never call a potential employer to ask a question that could easily be answered with a perfunctory search of their website.
  9. Always ask your interviewer for a business card so you can follow up appropriately.
  10. Never lie about your dates of employment or your reason for leaving your past employers.
  11. Never wear strong perfume or cologne to an interview. A great interview can be ruined if your fragrance irritates your interviewer’s allergies.